Writing
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Limericks – Precision, Rhymes and Fun!

A few years ago I used to regularly host the “Carnival of Healing,” which was begun by Philameana Lila Desy. During one of the carnivals, Madeleine Begun Kane submitted her blog for consideration. Madeleine’s “MAD KANE’S HUMOR BLOG Humor Columns, Limericks, Light Verse & Satirical Poems wasn’t a blog about healing  but I included it in the carnival anyway because it spelled FUN, and anything that brings fun brings about healing.

On Mondays, MAD KANE ‘s theme is Limerick-Off Monday, and everyone is invited to create and post a limerick based on several choices for the first lines provided by Madeleine.  The best submission is declared “Limerick of the week.” I often submit my limericks to MAD KANE.  I enjoy creating limericks as well as reading the limericks other bloggers post on her blog.

Wikipedia defines a limerick as “a short, humorous, often ribald or nonsense poem,[1] especially one in five-line anapestic or amphibrachic meter with a strict rhyme scheme (AABBA), which is sometimes obscene with humorous intent. The form can be found in England as of the early years of the 18th century.[2] It was popularized by Edward Lear in the 19th century,[3] although he did not use the term.”

If you want to learn how to write a limerick, click here and Madeleine will show you how.

Here are a couple of limericks I’ve submitted:

A fellow who frequently stews
Says he does it to satisfy his muse.
He plans in advance
As if it were a dance
And watches attentively as his muse chews.

A woman felt terribly bored
So she went out and bought a sword.
She learned how to wield it
But cut her hand with it;
She cried, fell asleep and snored.

It’s amazing, because when you start with the first line, thoughts, ideas come to mind.  I usually look for a word that would rhyme with the last word of each line and the rest just fall into place.  When it’s done, it feels great – like I’ve created a micro novella.

It’s fun to read limericks written by others:

A woman who frequently stews
Over trifles, set-backs and bad news
Should try meditation
‘Twould be her salvation
Letting harmony her being suffuse

–Ailsa McKillop

A fellow who likes to eats stews
Dined with a six pack of brews
The result he’d predict
Such a mix would inflict
A belly full of really bad news.

John Sardo

A man was disturbed by a line
On a mirror– cocaine, ground up fine.
“It’s Satan’s own powder.”
His tirade grew louder:
“It’s nothing to sniff at, you swine!”

–David Franks

A fish had encountered a line.
It seemed to the creature a sign
That was sent from Above.
“This worm? From God’s love!
I must seize, not deny, the Divine!”

–Jim Sullivan

Spring is sprung, can the snow now please vanish,
And sunshine our discontent banish?
As of now it makes sense
To get ourselves hence
Somewhere warm where the people speak Spanish.

–Sue Dulley

Your turn! Hop on over to MAD KANE’S HUMOR BLOG and post your limerick.  Who knows, your limerick may be crowned “Limerick of the Week!”

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Photo courtesy of Morguefile

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1 Comment

  1. Thanks so much for your lovely post about my humor blog, my article about writing limericks, and my weekly limerick writing challenges. I really appreciate your spreading the word,

    Thanks also for your fun contributions to my Limerick-Offs. Everyone’s welcome to join in, and I hope to see some of your readers at my Limerick-Off challenges.

    Thanks again!

    Like

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