All posts tagged: how to find your writing niche

How to Find Your Writing Niche (5/5)

My explorations of writing niches led me to two final discoveries – a writing niche in my head, and another in my heart. We all face the resistance to write because of messages from our ego, which many writers call the inner critic. The ego says we’re not good enough; why write when no one will read what you write? The ego will remind us that there are so many, many good writers out there, what chance do you have of making it in the writing world? Zero. This is one of the biggest hurdles we as humans have to face: the ego’s control. Spiritual masters tell us we must conquer the ego and make it serve us instead of us being subservient to it. The ego’s propensity to dominate is not present only in aspiring writers – every human being is subjected to the ego’s desire to be in control. Exploring the concept of a writing niche made me realize that if I am to continue writing, I need to silence the voice in my …

How to Find Your Niche (4)

The process of word play, or repeating and ruminating upon our chosen theme, writing niche, is a kind of mental mind mapping, clustering or webbing. I came up with this technique because although I understood the psychology behind mind mapping, clustering and webbing, I don’t particularly enjoy doing them.  Not wanting to lose out on the benefits of these techniques, I tried to do it verbally. It  felt more comfortable and I could do it anywhere and anytime – even if I had no pen and paper. Repeating the word or words in my head or aloud, several times during the day had the same effect as creating the maps, clusters or webs. Repeating or focusing on a word or concept verbally also enabled the mind to freely spin-off ideas associated with it. Let’s consider Elizabeth S Tyree’s response to the exercise. Focusing on the concept of writing niche, she associated it to: writing anywhere and everywhere, on a couch or over-sized ottoman, and YA fantasy. But in the end, she wonders, “Or maybe the only reason any of …

How to Find Your Writing Niche (3)

In one of his teleseminars, bestselling author Mark Matousek said that when he teaches people how to write, he doesn’t deal with grammar. What he does is help them get to the point where they are ready to write. How does one get to this place where one can write freely? You get there by finding your writing niches and then, by creating your writing niche. Elizabeth S Tyree has written nine books. When someone has written so many books, we always wonder how she or he does it. Elizabeth’s comment to the previous post about finding your writing niche gives us a peek into an author’s life. I asked her permission to publish the comment in this post and she graciously agreed. Maybe not all of us are meant to be or want to be authors. I myself have not decided if I really want to write a book. All I know is I want to write as freely and creatively as I can. Next week, we’ll discuss how we can arrive at a …

How to Find Your Writing Niche (1)

It seems so basic, but the most logical thing to do when you’re looking for something is to have a good idea of what you are looking for. What is a “writing niche?” You could surf the web for the meaning. But what you read from someone else’s blog is someone else’s definition of the phrase. I could define it here, and that would be my definition. But I am from a different culture. Could my definition be what you are looking for? The internet is a wonderful thing. It widens our horizons, but it could also make our perspectives narrower. There seems to be so many experts on just about anything. Have a question? Google it and you’ll find the answer. We get answers quickly. The caveat though is that we hardly think for ourselves now. We give away our power, we rely on others to provide us with the answers. What does “writing niche” mean to you? Define it in your own words. But don’t write down the answer immediately. Think about it, …

How to Find Your Writing Niche

When I set up this blog two and a half years ago, there were many questions in my mind about writing. I used this blog to help me answer those questions. Many years ago I worked briefly  – for three years – as a feature writer for the magazines published by a huge publishing conglomerate in Hong Kong.  As a feature writer, I wrote about everything under the sun but I tended to lean more on conservation and culture. I gave up that writing career to hearken to a call to help other people heal. But the love for writing kept knocking on my door and finally, after 8 years of working as an energy therapist,I decided to to find time to do some writing. I ventured into content writing and blogging. Blogging has enabled me to clarify and resolve many writing issues and answer many of the questions that lingered in my mind. I was never educated as a writer – I studied political science – and I didn’t know there was such a thing as a “writing …