All posts tagged: how to write good description

How to Write Crisp, Evocative Descriptions: Allow the Dream Eye to Inspire Your Writing (11)

Every night, as you sleep, the dream eye sets about to destroy your world – the world of logic, literal meaning, lock step order and cause and effect. It dismantles daylight visions, razes buildings, ravishers the landscape in preparation for paving what Freud called “the royal road to the unconscious.” -Rebecca McClanahan   McClanahan believes that for dreams to help writers, they must be used in the raw. Writers should not attempt to interpret dreams: “When we stop trying to figure out our dreams, to apply our conscious minds to the pictures the unconscious is painting, we may begin to feel the power of their images.” She explains further, “And we may find that those images emerge in our writing.” The author says writers can keep pen and paper within easy reach when they go to bed and record everything they remember about their dreams: feelings, shapes, physical details, and dialogue. McClanahan also suggests using the present tense when recording the dream because present tense verbs act as guides that lead you through the dream, When …

How to Write Crisp, Evocative Descriptions: Move to Inspire the Muse (9)

When we think of paying attention, we usually think of sitting still, of clearing our eyes and ears of distractions and concentrating on the object or scene before us. But sometimes the best way to be still – to still your mind and focus on your subjects – is to get moving. -Rebecca McClanahan McClanahan points to the practice of Claude Monet, whose studio was a boat floating down a river. Monet painted the objects that floated by, which was a challenge because the objects were moving. She explains: “Monet’s artistic vision, coupled with high emotional energy and a seemingly unquenchable passion for light, led him to create works that seemed to describe the most fleeting and fluid moments in nature.” McCalahan asks writers to consider incorporating some form of movement or activity into their writing life: “Concentrating on your body may free your mind to discover its own path.”  Now I understand why the words seem to flow more effortlessly after I do Qi Gong, Tai Chi or Yoga before journaling. McClanahan suggests:  “Before you write, take a …