All posts tagged: Ray Bradbury

Authors Talk About Life

Virginia Woolf: “Some people go to priests; others to poetry; I to my friends.” Ernest Hemingway: “In order to write about life first you must live it.” Ray Bradbury: “And what, you ask, does writing teach us? First and foremost, it reminds us that we are alive and that it is a gift and a privilege, not a right.” C. JoyBell C.:“I hope I don’t write TOO many books! When I look at authors who have written too many books, I wonder to myself “When did they live?” I certainly want to write BECAUSE I live! I know I don’t want to write in order to live! My writing is an overflow of the wine glass of my life, not a basin in which I wash out my ideals and expectations.” C.K. Webb:“It is a long journey, not just as a writer, but as a human being. Take nothing and no one for granted, be humble always, be kind especially when it’s difficult and never forget the place where you came from and the people …

Lessons from Ray Bradbury

I own only one book written by Ray Bradbury – Zen in the Art of Writing.  The small book’s cover is torn, and the pages have yellow speckles – signs of aging, as well as wear and tear.  For indeed, the book had been read over and over.  For almost a decade, it was the one book that could be found at different places in my bedroom. From Ray Bradbury’s book, I learned how important poetry is to a writer. “Read poetry every day of your life.  Poetry is good because it flexes muscles you don’t use often enough. Poetry expands the senses and keeps them in prime condition. It keeps you aware of your nose, your eye, your car, your tongue, your hand.  And, above all, poetry is compacted metaphor or simile.  Such metaphors, like Japanese paper flowers, may expand outward into gigantic shapes.  Ideas  lie everywhere through the poetry books, yet how rarely have I heard short story teachers recommending them for browsing.” Although Bradbury’s personality was so un-Zen, many of the things …

A Conversation with Ray Bradbury

“If you are writing without zest, without gusto, without love, without fun, you are only half a writer,” Ray Bradbury wrote in his small but seminal book, Zen in the Art of Writing. During his lifetime, Bradbury was a most prolific writer and  received several citations: He was awarded the 2000 National Book Foundation Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters, the 2004 national Medal of Arts, and the 2007 Pulitzer Prize Special Citation. One of the stories Bradbury frequently recounted throughout his life was his encounter with a carnival magician named Mr. Electrico.  They met in 1932 when Bradbury was only twelve years old.  The magician, Bradbury said, touched him with his sword and commanded him to “Live forever!” For the young Bradbury, it was the greatest idea he had ever heard and from then on he started to write everyday because,  “Not to write, for many of us, is to die.” This man LIVED.  And he continues to live through his close to fifty books, as well as the numerous essays, poems, operas, plays, teleplays …